Edwards: America In Denial About Racism, Doesn’t Want To Face It

With the NFL season just a couple of months away, Colin Kaepernick remains unemployed despite the fact that lesser quarterbacks – such as Austin Davis – have been gobbled up in free agency.

Kaepernick, 29, is clearly being black-balled by the NFL, and yet, many Americans wish to deny this. Why are so many people afraid to admit what is actually happening?

“Well, because America has been in denial about race and racism for a long time,” activist, sociologist, and author Dr. Harry Edwards said on CBS Sports Radio’s Gio and Jones. “There are people in this society – and unfortunately, a substantial minority – who would have been against what Colin did if he had been taking a knee on Main Street to the playing of Chopsticks. We need to understand that this struggle is ongoing. The same struggle that we fought in the wake of the Civil War for equality and justice and freedom, we’re confronted with a situation in this society today.”

 

 

Edwards, of course, is referring to police brutality.

“If you look from 1882 to the date of MLK’s assassination (April 4 1968), America averaged 40 lynchings of black people a year,” Edwards said. “Since Dr. King’s assassination through 2014, we averaged 140+ black men, women, and children being killed in the streets by police officers in this country. That is the kind of dynamic, that is the kind of circumstance, that Colin was protesting – and there are people who simply don’t want to face that.”

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